— Oliver Community League Update —

Public Spaces Matter

I lived in Oliver for more than seven years before I knew we had a pool. It isn’t really advertised. Instead, it’s tucked away in the middle of our neighbourhood. If you were walking by Oliver Park, the pool would be easy to miss.

Even though it’s hidden, Oliver Pool is a gem – especially in a city where we don’t have a beach to flock to on a hot day. When outdoor pools became free over the past two years, Oliver Pool became accessible to so many more.

Oliver has the most residents of any other neighbourhood in Edmonton, more than 18,000. Our population spans all ages, from babies in apartments to seniors in our many seniors residences. It spans abilities, incomes and cultures.

Our community has a potential hub in Oliver Park. We have the pool, unless City Council decides to close it, and the Oliver Community League is working hard to move through the city’s process to replace our hall on our land at Oliver Park. Our arena will not be replaced, which gives us space to develop a small facility to serve the needs of our community. We can preserve the playground, mature trees and green space. Imagine Oliver Park having something for everyone.

You’ll read more about the proposed land swap between Oliver Park and the former St. John’s School site, to allow the construction of a 24-storey tower on Oliver Park, in this issue of The Yards. The Oliver Community League recently voted against this proposal and will advocate for city
council to do the same.

Personally, I think it would be a shame to lose Oliver Park, the pool, and the overall potential of a community hub. There are so many other spaces to build towers along 104 Avenue.

My engineering background and passion for sustainable built environments drove me to the Oliver Community League, and I’ve relished the opportunity to shape what’s built here. But what these past five years have shown me is that infrastructure means nothing without a community. We need to invest in our public places, in our recreation spaces, in our complete streets. This is where we connect with our neighbours. And it is these relationships that build our communities.

Lisa Brown